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cited the last presidential election results, there is this desire for -- the task here in washington, it will be difficult to convince the u.s. government to change the way it has done business over the last 30 years -- some of that is necessary. the task is, how do you play the right role of engaging here? it is not naively giving money to liberal groups and not having a strategy. i believe this is a significant task inside egypt. it is an encouraging sign -- this is my prediction, it is going to force islamist political parties, at least elements of it to change their ideology. if the system remains open, if there is a big debate, i did not see it going backwards in terms of the diversity in egypt. it is hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> we're going to move toward closing remarks. we will go in reverse order. bret you can have your two minutes. >> 1979, an influential article was written, dictatorships and double standards. he argued -- in a position of find myself increasingly attracted to -- the united states is better served secular authoritarian regimes against to
many days and nights alone as i have tried to come up here and change things in washington. she's often reminded me or questioned how i thought i could change the world, when i couldn't even mow the grass. but she has been a supporter and certainly so important, as i left my children who were still in school and i began serving in the house, kept them on the right track. and i particularly want to thank them. all of you who served here know that when we sign up for public life we also sign our families up for public life. in a lot of ways it makes their lives much more difficult. so i want to thank my children, my wife, debbie, and family for putting up with this and being such a support. i also have to thank the people of south carolina who have entrusted me with this job in the senate for the last eight years and in the house six years before that. all of you know who served for your states. as you've traveled around and met people, toured businesses and spoken to groups, it really creates a deep love and appreciation for people back home. i look at what we're making in south carolina
foundation, one of the great conservative think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of so my reaction for the people of south carolina is -- you have lost a great, strong conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity, and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a - he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point
negotiations between capitol hill and the white house. from today's washington journal, this is about an hour. fiscal cliff. joining us here is stan collender and douglas holtz- eaken. what is happening? what are the two talking about. guest: the nature of the tax increases, how much, and on the other side, what kind of entitlement reforms as the president willing to offer? that has been going back and forth for quite awhile now. there are talking about the same basic issues. host: one of the shore signs of action in washington, we have heard there is a possibility that they could come back after christmas. guest: i have been telling clients since september we were going over the cliff. i was not sure there was a sign it or coming back before christmas. this last-minute deal of some time, it could easily be approved -- the house and senate do not need to be here for this because it will not be the big, big deal. this is not the grand compromise they are talking about here there is not enough support to do the technical things. this could be a simple package they do at the last minute. host: e
by way of warning shots? >> the state department has been very clear from washington, d.c. that we need both sides, all sides to remain calm to avoid escalating. when you have escalation, and intended mishap can occur. -- unintended mishap can occur. it is imperative that all sides try to resolve these issues among themselves in a calm, deliberate fashion to avoid escalation or provocative acts. >> use the example on the economic front, the chinese like to push and see how for the can push. is that what is going on now in this front? >> i do. what is worrisome about these islands is, it is one question when you have a trade dispute. it is another when you have something involving sovereignty. the chinese have this idea of core interest. core interest means hong kong, taiwan, tibet, and now these islands. you remove a certain amount of flexibility when you say something is a core interest. it rose right into the brain of the sovereignty question. china is on compromising on that. -- uncompromising on that. >> question over here. >> in 2011, when secretary gates was visiting china for mee
90% the new mentality in washington is that we don't to do it december 31. they have a couple of weeks in january before this starts to pinch a bit. it is not as much of a cliff that people were saying a few days ago? host: are we going over the cliff? guest: i think we're likely to do it. you don't have major economic effects on your afternoon's person income pay, paycheck. it is going to take a couple of weeks before that to start happening. you do have a brief week or two window where if they got something done it would be a political switch but not a major economic one. host: you're a veteran of the hill. when was the last time that congress was here between christmas and new year's? guest: i don't remember but it happens a lot on budget-related matters. when i worked on the hill there were lame-duck sessions but they did not go up this late. this is kind of chaos it is close to unprecedented. i've never seen a speaker be pushed back on by his own party as hard as what happened to john boehner this week. host: let me read to you "activists that helped john boehner's plan b
you again for joining us. i do not think if you ran research in the streets of tel aviv or washington you would find a lot of people who know who rousseau and voltaire are. if we want to wait until the palestinians know who they are, it is going to be a while. so let's put that aside for a second. the $10,000bout gdp. i think it is a lofty idea and a very good idea. let's assume that today the palestinians have $10,000 gdp. then what? >> again, in a moment, it is very easy to incite violence, to recruit terrorists when people are in a poor situation, a bad situation. today, with unemployment about 20% -- >> but he is giving you a hypothetical. >> i think is something we can achieve, $10,000. after this moment, the people will be ready because they have more to lose. today, many terrorists understand this is a way to feed their families, to get money from a radical, international movement, radical regimes. for them it as a way to feed their families. if they had more to lose, i think it will be completely different reality. i see for example in the balkan region what happens. remember,
the white house christmas decorations to military families. tomorrow on washington journal, paul weinstein, the former senior adviser to the simpson bowles commission, on the wall the commission's recommendations are playing in the ongoing negotiations concerning the fiscal cliff. from the government accountability office, they discussed the state of the facilities at guantanamo bay and the factors to be considered in moving detainee's stateside. and what did it did for near east policy, the latest from egypt after president mohammad morsi granted himself hoarse above the court. washington journal, live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton talks about her recent travels to the middle east to help broker a ceasefire agreement between israel and hamas and the gaza strip. she also, the iranian nuclear threat and criticizes israel's decision to build homes on israeli occupied lands. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> i am somew
a discussion about the 2012 presidential campaign. this is from today's washington journal. a look back at campaign 2012. joining us at the table is glenn thrush and jonathan martin of politico. guest: we had known that there >> we have known for some time there was always tension between the campaign staff and the candidate's family in terms of how to fill mitt romney's -- how to tell the romney story. so many americans saw this rich business man and they never got a sense for who he was as a person. one of the most fascinating is that we came across was, romney had a mormon documentarian follow him around in the campaign. he was a friend of one of the romney sons. he had great access. he made a documentary about romney. in 2010, he showed it to the family, they loved it. the staff said, we are not going to show this to the public. they thought it showed too much of him talking about his mormon faith in a way that they feared could turn off the public, which has some misconceptions about that faith. to me, that captured the attention in the romney campaign. the staff never wanted to ta
know that in washington introductions is an inverse importance of the person being introduced that's why the governor gave me such a long introduction. i'm going to be briefer here because i think you know these three people very, very well. first of all, there is teresa sullivan who was president and wasn't president and now is president of the university of virginia. we're happy about that. senator mark warner who in recent months and years has had the ability to talk to members of the other party about matters of the great interest to the country and has been very involved in the fiscal cliff negotiations and of course he of before he was senator he was a governor. then steve is the co-founder of america online. is a rabid twitter. i feel like i know every detail of your life. and a relentless of entrepreneurship. we're very fortunate to have these three panelistings. they get five to seven minutes -- there will be a little time left. five to seven minutes to discuss the topic and we're going have a discussion among us then we will open it up to you and hopefully, we will get to
. tomorrow on "washington journal, we will look at the major events and the a look at politics as we head into 2013, including legislation in congress and the tone of american politics. we are joined by a chicago tribune columnist, clarence page, live on c-span. >> there are, unlike tomczyk, about one dozen buildings around the world that are by far the most important places of the internet. they are places where more networks of the internet connects more than any whorl's, and they are mostly in places you would expect, london, frankfurt, tokyo, and places like ashburn, virginia, an unincorporated suburb not far from dulles airport, where if you ask the network engineers that i talk about, they would say new york, los angeles, ashburn, as if it were a global capital and not a tiny suburb. there is a surprisingly short list of places that are the hot spots on the internet. >> andrew blum looks for the internet in the real world monday night on "the communicators" on c-span2. next, 10 years of the e- government act, improving government access and productivity. this is just over one hour.
is really about. it's not about which political party comes out on top, or who wins or loses in washington. it's about making smart decisions that will have a real impact on your lives and the lives of americans all across the country. right now, middle-class tax cuts are set to expire at the end of the year. time is running out. and there are two things that can happen. first, if congress does nothing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. a typical middle-class family of four would get a $2,200 tax hike. that would be bad for families, it would be bad for businesses, and it would drag down our entire economy. now, congress can avoid all this by passing a law that prevents a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. that means 98% of americans and 97% of small businesses wouldn't see their income taxes go up by a single dime. even the wealthiest americans would get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. and families everywhere would enjoy some peace of mind. the senate has already done their part. now we're just waiti
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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